Review: Singing Bowl and Water Glass By Fracture Sounds

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Though our sample collections tend to be packed with the latest and greatest in core orchestral instruments, Fracture Sounds have created two gems. At US 18 dollars each, buying these instruments is a no-brainer.

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Review: Singing Bowl and Water Glass By Fracture Sounds

Though our sample collections tend to be packed with the latest and greatest in orchestral and other core sounds, there is another, often overlooked, area of the market that can be a treasure trove of gems. This is the world of the small boutique sample developers and instruments. One of these companies, Fracture Sounds, has created two libraries selling at 18 dollars each, that are worthy of the term “gem”. These are the Singing Bowl, a deeply sampled Tibetan Singing Bowl, and the Water Glass, wonderfully sampled water filled wine glasses.

Water Glass and Singing Bowl sell for £14.99 each and can be purchased from Fracture Sounds.

 

 

Thoughts


I’ll begin by jumping right into the Water Glass, a deep sampled water filled wine glass. Fractured Sounds have sampled it being played in two ways: percussively, as well as rubbed around the rim with a finger to create a sustained effect. The percussive shorts come in two varieties: finger hits and hard hits. The finger hits are wonderful and delicate creating the illusion of some kind of ethereal glockenspiel like sound. They are remarkably playable due to the fact that the library boasts an outrageously impressive number of velocity hits, up to 42. This articulation would be well at home with a pulsing delay.

The Hard Hits are a more aggressive sound created by hitting the glass with the back of the fingernails. The user is able to keyswitch between the hard and finger hits, or if they choose, can create an even more dynamically extreme version of the instrument by activating the “auto” function which causes the instrument to automatically toggle from the finger hits to the hard hits when the velocity crosses a certain threshold. Perhaps in a future update, they could introduce a slider to the interface allowing the user to select the velocity threshold for this transition.

As well as these shorts, we have our sustained articulation. This is created when a finger is rubbed around the rim of the glass to create a swirling glass like sustain. Anyone who has ever been bored at a wedding or dinner party will be familiar with this sound. It feels like somewhat of a rite of passage for any composer experimenting with sampling to create a small Kontakt instrument of this sound. It’s wonderful to now have easy access to a wonderful version of this instrument. What stands out as particularly well executed in this instrument are the dynamic modwheel cross-fade. Users will quickly notice and be pleasantly surprised that when they move the mod wheel, the cross-fade plays a sort of lingering game of catch up to your modwheel position. This ensures that the dynamic shifts always sound remarkably natural and true to the way a person increasing pressure as they rotate their finger around a real wine glass would cause a dynamic increase to sound.


Moving along to the Singing Bowl, we have a lot of the same kinds of content. This time instead of sounds sourced from a wine glass, we have a Tibetan singing bowl. The instrument includes a short articulation and a sustain. The sustain works in much the same way as the Water Glass with its clever and natural sounding dynamic modwheel cross fade. The sound is created by moving a wooden mallet in a circular motion around the rim of the bowl. The shorts, as with the Water Glass offer some interesting sounds. The two articulations can be key switched between or switched with a mouse click on the interface.

At the low price point of 18 dollars each, buying either or both of these instruments is a no-brainer. Both of them deliver usable, unique, and interesting sounds that would be sure to enhance the sample collection of any composer. I think we can all look forward to more great content from Fracture Sounds in the future.

Facts

Weighing in at under 40 MB each, these featherweight libraries pack an impressive and surprising punch. The Singing Bowl features two articulations, a short and a sustain. The Water Glass has both a short and a sustain as well as a third articulation: a heavier short. Both instruments are incredibly dynamic featuring modwheel cross-fading on the sustains and a large series of round robins and velocity layers for the shorts. The library does require the full version of Kontakt 5.1+ and will not work with the free Kontakt Player.

Water Glass and Singing Bowl sell for £14.99 each and can be purchased from Fracture Sounds.

 

Demos of Singing Bowl and Water Glass By Fracture Sounds

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Videos of Singing Bowl and Water Glass By Fracture Sounds