Review: Klüsterjunkk by Pornofonic

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Klüsterjunkk is a library of dirty percussion sounds that have been recorded from constructed and de-constructed junk such as bottles, tubes, plastics, pots prongs and pebbles. This is a great instrument to add some extra dirty tonal character to your percussion parts in your productions.

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Review: Klüsterjunkk by Pornofonic

Klüsterjunkk is a library of dirty percussion sounds that have been recorded from constructed and de-constructed junk such as bottles, tubes, plastics, pots prongs and pebbles.

Different techniques have been used in capturing these sounds from scratches, and thumps on the objects, to slaps and scrapes on the springs and chains and so on. So it’s a very experimental library. This is a great instrument to add some extra dirty tonal character to your percussion parts in your productions.

Klüsterjunkk can be purchased for $39 from Pornofonic

Thoughts

Klüsterjunkk is a very experimental percussion instrument, that can add a unique tonal timbre to your productions. First off I’d like to point out that the interface on this instrument is super easy to navigate. Some instruments can be quite complex where you have to jump to different tabs and windows to find things but this one is very simple. You basically have the Instrument section on the left. This has some basic controls like Tune, Decay, Width, and Pan. Here is run through on the type of instruments that have been constructed and sampled:

ChainJügg: A Heavy-gauge steel chain coiled inside a large PVC jug
Springbükket: Two springs drawn across a steel bucket and played like an upright bass
Rükkbokks: A handful of pebbles inside a heavy-duty carton
Plastikkbükket: Two hands and a heavy-duty plastic bin
Springtübe: Two springs and an empty canister
Bündelstikks: Variously-sized wooden slats bound together
Jüggbittz: Plastic shrapnel inside a large PVC jug
Plastikkröll: A thick roll of heavy-duty garbage bags
Tinesküpp: A porcelain cup and a handful of metal prongs
Steelpläte: A steel pot lid fitted to a plastic bin
Tübbglass: Eight glass jars loose in a plastic container

So as you can see, the instruments are a selection of some very experimental materials that produce their own unique sound.

Then, after this you have what I consider the key components in this instrument. These are the 3 effect sections that have been added: Convolution, a Delay interval setting and a Reverb. By itself the samples don’t sound like much, but when you enable these effects, this instrument really starts to shine. And you can even use these effects to completely warp the instrument.

With the Convolution you can choose different delay types and then under the Delay you can set what type of delay interval it’s using. After the Delay, you can add on different types of reverbs that range from stages, to rooms, to halls and plates. There’s even some interesting impulse responses like digital glitches, analog echoes, and static noises. So not your ordinary impulses, but this adds to the character of the instrument, the unorthodox use of impulses.

The final piece of the processing chain is the Saturation and Distortion section to add further destruction to your percussion sound. This unit has a High Pass Filter, Low pass filter, and then you can set the Distortion and Saturation amounts. When you push these quite far, it really breaks up the sound. These types of sounds sit quite nicely in moody industrial compositions.

Back to the Instrument section, I found if you automate the tune you can really get some interesting results. As the altered pitch gets passed through the effects and Distortion section adding even further mayhem with the sound. Also, editing the width can also have quite an effect on the sound. With the width all the way to the left the sound is mono but when you tweak it all the way to the right and enhance the stereo width. The stereo effects like the delays and reverb really come into their own on the sounds. Giving you way more interest and complexity in the sounds.

Now let’s take a look at some of the patches. These range from a selection of constructed and deconstructed objects. From metals to springs to plastics, you name it.

My favorite patches on the instrument are the Plastikkröll, and the Springbükket patches. Plastikkröll could work well for a bit of dirty warped percussion in a composition. I think maybe a sci-fi trailer style track. Then we get the Springbükket  which has a great acoustic percussive quality to it. And with the extra added modulated processing, it could really sit well in world music tracks.

It can go without saying that if you push up the distortion and saturation, then any of these patches will be ideal for industrial-flavored sounding compositions.

Another great feature are the snapshots. You can save up to 88 snapshots on each patch. This works well as you can tweak away on the instrument, effects and color and then save a snapshot when you find a collection and settings that you like, then recall them whenever you want.

This is a great instrument to add some extra dirty tonal character to your percussion parts in your productions. With the added effect processing to the patches it imparts some chaos and tonal color to your percussion parts. This would work well in ambient pieces, unique world music pieces and maybe even in sci-fi style compositions.

Facts

This is a small 230 MB size library with 11 Kontakt NKI instrument patches. It requires the full version of Kontakt 5.5.2 or later and can run on both Mac and Windows. Klüsterjunkk can be purchased for $39 from Pornofonic

 

 

 

Demos of Klusterjunkk

Videos of Klusterjunkk