First Look: Kepler Orchestra by Spitfire Audio

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Sophisticated, expressive and spot-on for 20th century systems writing, Spitfire’s latest Kontakt instrument release, Kepler Orchestra, offers virtual composers the opportunity to break free of DAW grid-lock and launch their compositions into the galaxy.

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First Look: Kepler Orchestra by Spitfire Audio

 

Spitfire Audio‘s Kepler Orchestra is a Kontakt Player Instrument and loads into the “Libraries” Tab of the FREE or full version of Native Instruments Kontakt

Spitfire unveiled the new Kepler Orchestra in extravagant style with a live event last week hosted by Paul Thomson with special live orchestral performances and a detailed look at the new library. The developer had promoted the new instrument for Kontakt a “secret weapon for writing cutting-edge film, TV and game scores.“

 

Grab the FREE DEMO Patches of Kepler Orchestra at Spitfire Audio.

Kepler Orchestra sells for $299 from Spitfire Audio

 

From the first tease of the libraries interface, I was excited to see it appeared to be an expansion on Spitfire‘s Evo Grid engine with a brand new set of orchestral samples recorded for creating interlocking polyrhythms.

I was familiar with the concept and the Evo Grid functionality as Sample Library Review has had the opportunity to review several of the Evo Grid releases including London Contemporary Orchestra Textures (watch review), Spitfire Symphonic Strings Evolutions (watch review), Olafur Arnalds Evolutions (watch review), a personal favorite Olafur Arnalds Chamber Evolutions (watch review), and even included Evo Grid instruments in the fan favorite Albion V Tundra (watch review).

The original Evo Grid libraries PP025 Evo Grid 4 Woodwinds (read review) and PP021 Evo Grid 3 (see review) were also updated this year and delivered in Spitfire Audio‘s stand-alone plugin released as the Spitfire Audio’s New Evolutions: Angular String, Fragile String & Woodwind (read review). That said, with the release of Kepler, Spitfire had taken a high-concept route and promised to bring the spirit of 20th-century American composers such as Terry Riley, Philip Glass, Steve Reich and John Adams to the virtual world.

Kepler Orchestra uses the new “Systems Grid” engine.

Steve Reich is one of my all-time favorite 20th-century composers. In particular, his Different Trains composition, recorded in collaboration with the Kronos Quartet had a huge influence on my early compositional attempts and the compound meter and polyrhythmic syncopation had never left my bloodstream.  Hearing the demos for this library was promising but there was a lot that could go wrong in trying to bring serialized and system music to the virtual stage.

I was also a little weary because I had read more than a few grumblings on the internets that the library was not playing nice with the Kontakt engine and some users were reporting pops and clicks.

So the first questions I hoped to answer in this video first look was: Will this stand up to the balance of systems music that Has inspired me over the years? And  . . With all the math this instrument must be crunching would it bring my maxed out 2018 mac mini’s CPU to its knees?

I am happy to report a positive review of the instrument on both fronts. I  got spooked while recording my first look video (above)  as I heard a couple of faint pops and clicks while my audio buffer in Logic was set at 256 while screen recording. I can confirm that with my screen recording software off I had no problems at a 256 buffer setting.  After a change to 512 with screen recording on I did not experience any pops or clicks.

Kepler Orchestra comes with 259 Kontakt Snapshot presets

The orchestral library for Kontakt was designed to evoke movement, speed, and atmosphere by creating interlocking orchestral rhythms ranging from the simple to massively complex patterns. I can say it meets all the marketing speak with the added icing on the cake being the musical and emotional abilities of the library to evoke movement and contrast that you just cannot get out of a traditional multi-sampled orchestral instrument.

The “Warped” nkis delivers a subtle yet sophisticated set of sound design instruments that will be perfect for underscore.

Just 45 minutes into checking out Kepler, I can easily endorse this as a sophisticated, expressive Kontakt instrument that is spot-on for 20th century systems writing and perfect for today’s composer working on underscore. This library offers virtual composers the opportunity to break free of DAW grid-lock and launch their compositions into new galaxies.

In the video above, I share the first look of Kepler Orchestra as I listen through a random selection of the included patches and start to experiment with the microphone positions and functionality the library offers.

 

 

Facts

Kepler Orchestra downloads as 37.4 GB and is a Kontakt Player Instrument compatible with both the FREE or Full Kontakt 5.6.8 or higher.

The library contains a sample set from recording sessions of 40 Strings, 13 Woodwinds and 19 Brass players captured as separate ensembles in Studio One at the Air Lyndhurst, London.

The library comes with 54 Articulations and allows users to blend and mix across 4 microphone positions including Close, Ambient, Mid & Wide as well as the availability of a “Full Mix”.

The heart of the Kepler Orchestra is the new Systems Grid Engine used for all but the “Warped” presets. In total the library comes with 259 Snapshots for performing complex interlocking polyrhythms organized by time divisions (duplet, triplet, quintuplet and septuplet time) and tempo-locked to the users DAW.

Grab the FREE DEMO Patches of Kepler Orchestra at Spitfire Audio.

Kepler Orchestra sells for $299 from Spitfire Audio

 

Demos of Kepler Orchestra by Spitfire Audio

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